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Past Members

Graduate Students

Andrew Pillar, M.Sc.

Graduate Student

2012-2014 - Andrew graduated from TRU in Geography and is his M.Sc. focused on using isotopes and geolocators to examine migratory connectivity in Bullock’s orioles and examine impacts of environmental factors occurring throughout the year on population abundance. (Awarded NSERC PGS). Resulting publications: Pillar, A.G.*, P.P. Marra, N.J. Flood, and M.W. Reudink. 2016. Moult-migration in Bullock’s orioles (Icterus bullockii) confirmed by geolocators and stable isotope analysis. Journal of Ornithology 157: 265-275 Pillar, A.G.*, S. Wilson, N.J. Flood, and M.W. Reudink. 2015. Population response to environmental productivity throughout the annual cycle in a migratory songbird. Population Ecology 57: 163-173.

Cara Snell, M.Sc (UNBC)

Graduate Student

Cara is back in the BEAC lab! This time, she's working on mountain chickadee urbanization and song transmission. Her M.Sc. is based out of UNBC and co-supervised by Ken Otter.

Claudie Pageau, M.Sc. (TRU)

Graduate Student

Our first francophone, Claudie joined us from Quebec and her work addressed big picture questions in the evolution of moult and migration in birds. *Published manuscripts in Ecology & Evolution and Biology Letters, with another manuscript in prep for submission—all prior to defending); Awarded Environmental Science Fellowship, FRQNT (Quebec) MSc Research Scholarship, Dr. Sherman Jen Graduate Entrance Award, NSERC PGS (declined); Winner of a Best Student Presentation Award at SCO-SOC 2019 and at the NAOC 2020

Undergraduate Students

Ryan Germain, B.Sc. Honours

Undergraduate Student

Queen’s University, 2005-2006 - Ryan's Honours thesis examined whether the bright orange plumage patches exhibited by male American redstarts signal the amount of care a male may provide to offspring. Ryan found that indeed, redstart plumage does predict parental investment and suggests that females may be using these plumage cues to assess the levels of parental care males may provide to offspring. Resulting paper: Germain, R. R*., M. W. Reudink, P. P. Marra and L. M. Ratcliffe. 2010. Carotenoid-based male plumage predicts parental investment in the American redstart (Setophaga ruticilla).Wilson Journal of Ornithology 122: 318-325. Other co-authored papers: Germain, R.R.*, M.W. Reudink, P.P. Marra, P.T. Boag, and L.M. Ratcliffe. 2012. Delayed maturation of multiple signals in a migratory songbird. Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology. 66: 419-431. Osmond, M.M.*, M.W. Reudink, R.R. Germain**, P.P. Marra, J.J. Nocera, P.T. Boag, and L.M. Ratcliffe. 2013. Carotenoid-based female plumage is correlated with age, reproductive behavior and mate color in the American redstart. Canadian Journal of Zoology 91: 589-595.

Matthew Osmond, B.Sc. Honours

Undergraduate Student

Queen’s University, 2007-2008 - Matt's honours thesis examined the role of female plumage colouration in the highly sexually dichromatic songbird, the American redstart. While much research has focussed on the role of the generally showier male plumage, Matt's research suggested that female plumage may also act as an indicator of individual quality in female American redstarts. Resulting paper: Osmond, M.M.*, M.W. Reudink, R.R. Germain**, P.P. Marra, J.J. Nocera, P.T. Boag, and L.M. Ratcliffe. 2013. Carotenoid-based female plumage is correlated with age, reproductive behavior and mate color in the American redstart. Canadian Journal of Zoology 91: 589-595.

Rebekah Oomen, B.Sc. Honours

Undergraduate Student

Trent University, 2009-2010 - Rebekah's honours thesis research examined the mitochondrial genetic structure of American white pelicans across North America using mtDNA sequencing. Her objective was to determine whether numerous perceived historic or contemporary obstacles to gene flow, such as the Pleistocene glaciations, the North American Continental Divide, and differences in migratory behaviour, were acting to cause genetic differentiation between different groups of pelicans. Resulting paper: Oomen, R.A., M.W. Reudink, J.J. Nocera, C.M. Somers, M.C. Green, and C.J. Kyle. 2011. Mitochondrial evidence for panmixia despite perceived barriers to gene flow in a widely distributed waterbird. Journal of Heredity. 102: 584-592.
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